TProArt

Art & Technology, Electronic Music & Sound Design

Dance

Please find information about dancing  here .

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2 comments on “Dance

  1. Aidan Boyle
    June 19, 2013

    Within the fully interactive parts the live sound was manipulated by the movement on
    several levels:
    Sounds were radically transformed both in their gestural articulation and their timbral
    characteristics, that is, spectral structure, register and colour. A technique called granular
    synthesis was used to change the morphology of the sound – the sound being broken
    down into tiny grains, which are then remoulded in time by the movement dynamics.
    This technique also allows for radical transformation of the sound’s texture and density.
    A further musical parameter subject to being driven by the movement was the
    spatialization, or projection of sound. Using algorithms which allowed the detailed
    placing of a sound anywhere in the space, the sound could be made to ‘revolve’ as the
    dancer moved, or appear more distant or present, depending on her type of movement.
    The sound-material used was mainly flute recordings made by the soloist. These varied
    from fragments of conventional playing to a range of extended techniques, working a lot
    with the sound of the breath. The solo flute plays an initiatory role, the dancer
    responding and simultaneously affecting the live-transformed sound. An arresting
    example of this relationship can be seen in the first interactive section where a ‘double
    exposure’ effect is achieved by having the passages played on the flute simultaneously
    transformed by the system as the dancer moves: the passages are echoed and extended
    through the dancer’s body. Additionally, it was anticipated that the dancer would further
    react to the sounds she herself generated, creating a positive feedback loop.

    BANNERMAN 2005

  2. jupiter2260
    June 21, 2013

    responding and simultaneously affecting the live-transformed sound. An arresting
    example of this relationship can be seen in the first interactive section where a ‘double
    exposure’ effect is achieved by having the passages played on the flute simultaneously
    transformed by the system as the dancer moves: the passages are echoed and extended
    through the dancer’s body. Additionally, it was anticipated that the dancer would further
    react to the sounds she herself generated, creating a positive feedback loop.

    BANNERMAN 2005

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